Parents and Sports-Related Concussions

Michelle Camicia, MSN, PhD, the mother of two student athletes, discusses the role of parents who must pay attention to their childrens’ symptoms if they play contact sports. Are these symptoms consistently understood by student athletes and coaches? She argues for more education and advocacy to address the problem of sports-related concussion in high school sports.

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Parents play a major role in identifying the effects of concussions in their daughters and sons, helping them manage symptoms, and supporting their recovery.

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There are many reasons why kids do not report concussions. They must be educated about brain injuries, including concussions. They must be empowered to report to an adult any symptoms after a blow to the head, neck, or body that causes neurological symptoms (like dizziness, headache, or confusion). Removal from the sport or activity followed by evaluation by a licensed healthcare provider should be expedited.

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Parents must communicate with the school after their son or daughter has a concussion to make sure that there are accommodations if needed during recovery.

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Talk to Your Kids About the Concussion Risk of Collision Sports

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Children and adolescents must understand that if they have any symptoms after a blow or jolt to the head or neck they must stop immediately and get help from an adult.

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